Driving Tips, Rules & Regulations in Morocco

Despite the smaller population and vehicle density, Morocco still has a higher motor vehicle accident rate than the UK, so it’s normal for new foreign expats to feel nervous when they’re new to driving in Morocco.

The minimum age for driving is 21 years old, although there are rental companies that impose a minimum age of 25 years old – in addition to one year of driving experience – before a person can rent from them. You’ll need both your local driver’s license and an international driving license to be able to drive within Moroccan jurisdiction. With that being said, make sure you keep your car registration documents as well as your passport, insurance documents, and other important papers with you at all times.

Take care to drive defensively, in addition to following the rules and staying on the right side of the ride. It’s always best to keep your distance from other vehicles in case something unexpected takes place. Sometimes you might even need to bend the rules a bit if it means avoiding an accident. Slow down around traffic lights. Yes, even when they’re green. Always make a habit of looking both sides before crossing an intersection, but doing so with caution. There are many motorists that ignore these traffic lights, especially when it seems that the roads are clear.

Fines for over speeding go as high as 400 DH, so avoid going over the speed limits. The limits are 50 km/h in built-up areas and 100 km/h on both open roads and highways. The police use their speed guns quite strictly so you could be fined for going as little as 5 km/h over the limits. For those who are accustomed to a different speed metric, take note that 1km/h is 0. 62 mph.

Road signs in the country are pretty easy to read since they all comply with ISO (European) standards. The stops signs are in Arabic though, but it’s easy to spot because the sign is still a red octagon. On the road, you’ll notice that single carriage ways are marked with white lines while dual carriage ways have yellow lines on them.

You’ll know if a certain spot is a roundabout because they’re usually marked with “give way” signs. Remember that vehicles entering the traffic must give way to those who are already circulating within the traffic. You might have to be a bit more defensive around other types of junctions, though, because crossroads are normally not marked.

You’ll also notice that very few motorists give way to pedestrians. Some of them even park on the marked crossings. Obviously, this isn’t something that you should follow.

Summary

Morocco as quite high motor vehicle accident rates, so always be aware when driving.
The minimum legal age for driving is 21 years old.
You'll need both your local driver's license and an international driving license to be able to drive within Moroccan jurisdiction.
Make sure you keep your car registration documents as well as your passport, insurance documents, and other important papers with you at all times.
Slow down around traffic lights even when they're green. Many motorists ignore them.
Speed limits are 50 km/h in built-up areas and 100 km/h on both open roads and motorways.
All road signs comply with European standards so they should be familiar to you.
Very few motorists give way to pedestrians.

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