Driving Tips, Rules & Regulations in Iceland

If your idea of a vacation is taking a drive to a naturally rugged landscape and enjoying the untouched sights of the outdoors, then you’re going to enjoy driving in Iceland. The majority of the mountain paths in the country have a gravel surface, which happen to be loose especially at the sides, so it’s going to take a lot of skill and caution to be able to drive these parts safely. Be extra careful whenever there’s an approaching vehicle because most of these mountain paths as well as most bridges are narrow.

The speed limits are 50 km/h for urban gravel roads and 80 km/h in the rural areas. Asphalt roads normally have a 90 km/h limit. But because of the terrain, the best thing to do is to drive slowly, which can be good if you plan on savouring the scenery longer, although that would mean longer travel periods. Also, keep a sharp eye out for danger signs, as they will help you anticipate accident prone areas that you may be heading towards, such as sharp curves.

Because of the nature of the roads, drivers in Iceland are required by law to have seatbelts at all times and to keep their headlights on at all times, ever during the day. It is also prohibited to drive off road as well as driving under the influence of alcohol.

Foreign driver’s licenses are accepted in Iceland. Make sure you have proof of your third party motor vehicle insurance at all times, as this is mandatory for motorists. A Green Card is the best kind of proof. While there are some exceptions (i. e. cars from Austria, Denmark, etc. ), it’s safer to just have these documents with you, along with your car’s registration and passport.

Almost all of the fuel stations in Iceland are open 24 hours, and they all have self-service stations that accept all major credit cards. Take note that many of the mountain tracks are closed whenever they undergo wet and muddy conditions, so make to anticipate this when planning your vacations.

There are many places to park in Iceland, and the locations, rules, and charges vary from place to place. Parking rates, however, are more expensive the closer you are to the city centre, such as in Reykjavik.

To maximize your access to beautiful sights, take the Ring Road (Route 1). It extends around the Iceland coast, going as far as 832 miles. Going through this route alone will expose you to the best sights in Iceland. Plus, the road is well maintain, although there might be some areas with gravel surfaces, so don’t forget to put safety first.

When driving in Iceland, safety is top priority. Make sure that you don’t get too distracted by the incredibly nature sights and still keep your eye on the road. Don’t forget to ask locals for information on the current conditions of the road as well as of the weather. Finally, bring GPS technology with you so you won’t get lost.

Summary

The speed limits are 50 km/h for urban gravel roads and 80 km/h in the rural areas. Asphalt roads normally have a 90 km/h limit.
Due to it terrain, its advised to drive slowly.
Keep a sharp eye out for danger signs, as they will help you anticipate accident prone areas.
Drivers are required to wear seat belts at all times and to keep their headlights, ever during the day.
It is also prohibited to drive off road.
Many of the mountain tracks are closed whenever there are wet and muddy conditions.

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