Driving Tips, Rules & Regulations in Cyprus

For those who want to venture to Europe, visiting Cyprus would be a good place to be exposed to a wide array of cultures as well as find beautiful sights while enjoying the nice weather. Of course, it’s easiest to get around by car, not only because public transport there isn’t always reliable, but because it’s easier to get to the less accessible tourist spots.

Cypriots, which is what the locals are called, drive on the left, and give way to traffic that’s coming from the right side of the road. The rest of the driving regulations are very similar with other European countries: seat belts are mandatory, using a mobile phone whilst driving is prohibited, and anyone caught by authorities violating them will be fined on the spot. Common sense dictates that you should also bring your license, registration, and other pertinent documents with you at all times as well.

Cyprus also observes a zero tolerance policy for drunk driving. In fact, you’re prohibited from eating or drinking anything while driving. You are also required to deactivate any radar equipment that comes with your GPS system while driving in the country.

Majority of roads in Cyprus conform to international standards, although you may find yourself in uncovered forest roads at some point in your travels. In these instances, extra care should be taken, especially during the winter months of January and February. Most insurance policies don’t cover damage resulting from driving on unsurfaced roads. But because you won’t want to miss out on visiting the villages of Cyprus, which are beautiful alternatives to the town life, you need to be extra careful with driving.

Speed limits indicated on signs are all in km/h. You’ll find these signs, along with other international road traffic signs, on the left side of the road. Motorways normally have a 100 km/h max and 65 km/h minimum limit. Open roads observe an 80 km/h limit, and towns and other build-up areas have a 50 km/h limit. You’ll also be happy to know that there is no need to pay tolls on motorways in Cyprus.

Try not to drive West late in the afternoon, so as not to be driving under the glare of the sunset, which can be more dangerous than it is uncomfortable. At night time, watch out for intense headlight glares. There aren't very many street lights, so most motorists turn their headlights on.

Parking is quite affordable in Cyprus, except on Saturday afternoons when they are free. It’s also easy to find spots to park anywhere in cities. Most 24 hour petrol stations have ATM machines that facilitate both card and credit card transactions. Since 2009, unleaded fuel costs 0. 96 Euros per litre. This fuel comes in three grades of octane content. Most cars use the 98 variety, but if you’re not sure, you can always ask the car company where you rented the car.

Lastly, vehicles that are registered in the UK that have Euro-plates don’t need GB stickers. These Euro-plates have a circle of 12 stars on them. Other vehicles will require some national identification.

Summary

Drive on the left, give way to traffic that’s coming from the right side of the road.
Seat belts are mandatory, using a mobile phone while driving is prohibited.
Take your license, registration, and other pertinent documents with you at all times.
You're prohibited from eating or drinking anything while driving.
Radar equipment must be disabled.
Motorways normally have a 100 km/h max and 65 km/h minimum limit. Open roads observe an 80 km/h limit, and towns and other build-up areas have a 50 km/h limit.

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